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GAGE/SAGE 2023 Community Science Workshop

Date(s): March 26-29, 2023
Location: Pasadena, CA
event banner reads: GAGE/SAGE 2023 Community Science Workshop, March 27-29, 2023 in Pasadena, CA

Be sure to register during the Early Bird period (deadline February 24) in order to be able to present a poster. You will have until March 3 to actually submit the abstract.


We are currently accepting proposals for Special Interest Group (SIG) breakout sessions — 1.5-hour sessions to foster community discussion and exchange – Deadline January 24, 2023

This workshop focuses on cutting edge geophysical results of processes in the solid earth, cryosphere, oceans, atmosphere, and even other planets. It highlights synergies between the geodetic and seismic research communities in time, space, and methods for approaching datasets and changes in the Earth System. It provides an opportunity to learn about cutting edge research, engage with other members of the community, and expand technical skills.

The Workshop is sponsored by the the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and US Geological Survey (USGS). The Geodetic Facility for the Advancement of Geoscience (GAGE) and the Seismological Facility for the Advancement of Geoscience (SAGE) are run by EarthScope Consortium, through cooperative agreements with NSF. EarthScope Consortium was formed through a merger of IRIS and UNAVCO.

Format

The workshop will be held in-person with no virtual component.

All meeting attendees will be required to adhere to the EarthScope Code of Conduct.

Workshop Goals

  • Facilitate geodetic and seismic scientific research by sharing results and planning future endeavors, and
  • Foster community among geodetic and seismic researchers, faculty, students, and facility staff,
  • Provide a venue for professional development in scientific and technical careers.

Workshop Leadership

Science Planning Committee:

  • Caroline Beghein, University of California Los Angeles
  • Kristel Chanard, Université de Paris
  • Eric Lindsey, University of New Mexico
  • Zhongwen Zhan, California Institute of Technology

EarthScope Planning Contacts:

  • Beth Pratt-Sitaula, EarthScope Consortium
  • Justin Sweet, EarthScope Consortium

Have questions? Please contact communityat symbolearthscope.org for more information.

COVID Protocols

We will be following the local health orders for Pasadena, California. At the time of writing (January 16, 2023) the City of Pasadena “strongly recommends that everyone stay up to date on COVID-19 vaccination” and “strongly recommends individuals to wear face masks while indoor in all workplaces and public settings”. We will continue to link the latest guidance here if it is updated. We encourage all participants to follow City of Pasadena health recommendations. Masks will be available at the workshop registration table.

As part of the registration process, participants will be asked to commit to not attending workshop events if they test positive or develop symptoms during or within 5 days of the start of the workshop, or as otherwise recommended by local health orders.

Important Dates
Student/Postdoc Travel Scholarship Application Deadline
Special Interest Group Proposal Deadline
January 24
Early Bird Registration (poster presenters must register during the early bird period)Register
January 24 – February 24 (ends 11:59 ET)
Discount Hotel Booking Deadline
Exhibitor Reservation DeadlineReserve
February 24
Poster Abstract Submission Deadline
Registration Refund Request Deadline (COVID exception)
March 3
Registration Closes
March 19 (ends 11:59 ET)
Short Courses
Sunday March 26
Workshop
Monday March 27 morning – Wednesday March 29 noon

Be sure to register during the Early Bird period (deadline February 24) in order to be able to present a poster. You will have until March 3 to actually submit the abstract.


Registration fees
Early Bird Registration (January 24 – February 24)
$200 student/postdoc
$400 regular
Regular Registration (February 25 – March 19)
$250 student/postdoc
$500 regular
Participants currently at institutions in low and low-middle income countries may request a fee waiver. We use the economic definitions given by the World Bank. Please contact communityat symbolearthscope.org prior to starting the registration process, if you would like to request a waiver.

Refunds: 100% refund available until March 3. No refunds issued after March 3 (COVID exception). Contact communityat symbolearthscope.org for a refund request.

Timetimetim
7:00 am
2:00 pm
Registration Desk Open
All-day Short Courses – see detailed descriptions in Short Courses tab
8:00 am> GAMIT/GLOBK In A Day (GNSS Processing)
5:30 pm> InSAR Data Interpretation and Analysis for Nonspecialists
> Virtual Deep Seismic Sounding Made Easy
1:30 pm
5:30 pm
Half-day Short Course – see detailed descriptions in Short Courses tab
> All About Southern California Seismic & Earthquake Data
4:00 pm
7:00 pm
Registration Desk Open
6:30 pm
8:00 pm
Welcome Event: First-time Attendees & Students
6:30-6:45 pm – First-time Attendee Welcome
6:45-7:45 pm – Student Welcome Event
Timetimetim
7:00 am
5:00 pm
Registration Desk Open
7:00 amBeverage Service – Coffee & Tea
8:00 amWelcome & Introductory Remarks
Plenary Session: Earth and Planetary Structure
Chairs: Ebru Bozdag (Colorado School of Mines), Corné Kreemer (University of Nevada Reno)
> Linking Surface Deformation with Mantle Dynamics from Numerical Modeling with Data Assimilation – Lijun Liu (University of Illinois)
8:30 am> InSight on Mars, 2018-2022: What a Single Station on Mars was able to Reveal About the Interior from Near-surface to the Core – Mark Panning (JPL)
> Weak Base of the Upper Mantle Revealed by Postseismic Deformation Following a Deep (~560 km) Earthquake – Sunny Park (University of Chicago)
> Probing Lowermost Mantle Dynamics with Observations of Seismic Anisotropy – Jonathan Wolf (Yale University)
10:15 amBreak
10:45 amSpecial Interest Group Breakout Sessions
Exact topics coming soon
12:15 pmLunch
Plenary Session: Hazards, Transients, and Society
Chairs: Roby Douilly (University of California Riverside), Dara Goldberg (USGS)
> The Value and Challenges of High Spatial Resolution Satellite Observations for Volcano Science and Hazard Mitigation – Matthew Pritchard (Cornell University)
1:45 pm> Towards Volcanic Hazards Assessment Using Transient Detection in the Natron Rift, Tanzania – D. Sarah Stamps (Virginia Tech)
> Earthquake Early Warning along the US West Coast: Improving Detection and Characterization of Offshore Events with Limited Data – Amy Williamson (University of California Berkeley)
> Satellite Sensing of Precursory Motion for Landslide Inundation Forecasting – Yuankun Xu (University of California Berkeley)
3:30 pmBreak
4:00 pm
5:45 pm
Poster session
6:00 pm
7:00 pm
Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Activity
Timetimetim
7:00 am
8:00 am
Student & Early Career Networking Breakfast
7:00 am
5:00 pm
Registration Desk Open
7:00 amBeverage Service – Coffee & Tea
8:00 amCommunity Session: Broader Impacts of Integrated Geophysical Data
Plenary Session: Evolving Landscape and Climate
Chairs: Marine Denolle (University of Washington), Chris Harig (University of Arizona)
> DAS in the Cryosphere – Dominik Graeff (University of Washington)
8:30 am> Groundwater Monitoring using GNSS – Justine Overacker (University of Nevada Reno)
> Seismo-geomorphology – Danica Roth (Colorado School of Mines)
> Open Science with IcePyx – Jessica Scheick (University of New Hampshire)
10:15 amBreak
10:45 amSpecial Interest Group Breakout Sessions
Exact topics coming soon
12:15 pmLunch & Group Photo
Plenary Session: Seafloor and Marine Geophysics
Chairs: Noel Bartlow (University of Kansas), Ƶack Spica (University of Michigan)
> Imaging the Cascadia Subduction Zone with Marine Active Source Seismic Data – Shoushou Han (University of Texas)
2:00 pm> Marine Geophysical Studies of a Vapor-Driven Hydrothermal Field on the Floor of Yellowstone Lake – Robert A Sohn (WHOI)
> Probing the Solid Earth and the Hydrosphere with Ocean-Bottom Distributed Acoustic Sensing – Loïc Viens (LANL)
> Geodesy on the Seafloor – Mark Zumberge (UCSD/SIO)
3:45 pmBreak
4:15 pm
6:00 pm
Poster session
Timetimetim
7:00 am
11:00 am
Registration Desk Open
7:00 amBeverage Service – Coffee & Tea
8:00 amCommunity Session: Opportunities for Science Innovations from
Integrated Geophysical Data
Plenary Session: New Opportunities and Future Directions
Chairs: Peter James (Baylor University), Chairs: Mark Panning (JPL)
> Geodesy Transforming Our Understanding of Planetary Interior – Anton Ermakov (University of California Berkeley)
8:30 am> The Future of Seismology Across the Solar System – Dani Della Giustina (University of Arizona)
> Electromagnetic Investigations of the Interiors of Solid Worlds – Robert Grimm (Southwest Research Institute)
> Future Lunar Geophysical Mission Opportunities including the Lunar Geophysical Network – Heidi Fuqua Haviland (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center)
10:15 amBreak
11:15 am
12:00 pm
Final Community Session & Closing Remarks

Caltech Seismo Lab Tour – Optional additional activity

Wednesday March 29 – 12-3 pm (lunch on your own in the Lake Avenue area and tour 1:30-2:30 pm)

Just after the GAGE/SAGE Workshop ends, participants have the chance to take a tour of the Caltech Seismological Laboratory, a bit over a mile away from the Pasadena Convention Center.

Building on a rich history of geophysical study, the Seismological Laboratory—informally known as the Seismo Lab—serves as a focal point for earthquake information in Southern California and the world. The Lab is a modern geophysical observatory that emphasizes the acquisition, analysis, and modeling of data pertaining to the structure and dynamics of the earth as well as other planetary bodies and uses data from many sources including regional and global seismic networks, oceanic research cruises, remote sensing, and geologic field mapping.

After the GAGE/SAGE Workshop ends around noon March 29, participants who have registered for the Seismo Lab tour will be able to take public transportation to the popular Lake Avenue shopping/restaurant district before walking the last few blocks to Caltech campus for the tour. The tour will start at 1:30 pm and take approximately 1 hour.

You can register for this tour during the regular workshop registration process.

Plenary Sessions

Earth and Planetary Structure – Monday morning

This session brings together seismological and geodetic studies of the interior of the Earth and other planets that contribute to our understanding of planetary structure, formation, and evolution. It will highlight studies using new datasets, modeling approaches, or observational techniques to explore the structure of a planet and to help relate surface processes to the interior. A short list of examples includes geodetic inferences on viscosity or density, plate deformation, or seismological studies of wave velocities, attenuation, anisotropy and core or mantle dynamics.

Chairs: Ebru Bozdag (Colorado School of Mines), Corné Kreemer (University of Nevada Reno)

  • Linking Surface Deformation with Mantle Dynamics from Numerical Modeling with Data Assimilation – Lijun Liu (University of Illinois)
  • InSight on Mars, 2018-2022: What a Single Station on Mars was able to Reveal About the Interior from Near-surface to the Core – Mark Panning (JPL)
  • Weak Base of the Upper Mantle Revealed by Postseismic Deformation Following a Deep (~560 km) Earthquake – Sunny Park (University of Chicago)
  • Probing Lowermost Mantle Dynamics with Observations of Seismic Anisotropy – Jonathan Wolf (Yale University)

Hazards, Transients, and Society – Monday afternoon

Modern seismic and geodetic techniques (and their combinations) have given us the ability to sense transient crustal processes in unprecedented detail. This session focuses on new measurement techniques and new observations of Earth hazards (earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, etc.) and other transient sources, and on the insight these data can provide into the physical processes driving such events. A crucial component of hazard mitigation involves effective and timely public outreach and engagement; this session also serves to highlight these efforts. We invite discussion on how SAGE & GAGE can help us better prepare (scientifically and societally) for future occurrences.

Chairs: Roby Douilly (University of California Riverside), Dara Goldberg (USGS)

  • The Value and Challenges of High Spatial Resolution Satellite Observations for Volcano Science and Hazard Mitigation – Matthew Pritchard (Cornell University)
  • Towards Volcanic Hazards Assessment Using Transient Detection in the Natron Rift, Tanzania – D. Sarah Stamps (Virginia Tech)
  • Earthquake Early Warning Along the US West Coast: Improving Detection and Characterization of Offshore Events with Limited Data – Amy Williamson (University of California Berkeley)
  • Satellite Sensing of Precursory Motion for Landslide Inundation Forecasting – Yuankun Xu (University of California Berkeley)

Evolving Landscape and Climate – Tuesday morning

Advances in seismo-geodetic observations provide an unprecedented opportunity to study environmental processes beyond the solid Earth. This session explores the potential of these observations to quantitatively monitor various variables relevant to further our understanding of the evolving landscape and climate. Examples of variables include, but are not restricted to, terrestrial water storage, ice sheet and glacier mass, sediment transport, tropospheric water vapor and sea level.

Chairs: Marine Denolle (University of Washington), Chris Harig (University of Arizona)

  • DAS in the Cryosphere – Dominik Graeff (University of Washington)
  • Groundwater Monitoring Using GNSS – Justine Overacker (University of Nevada Reno)
  • Seismo-geomorphology – Danica Roth (Colorado School of Mines)
  • Open Science with IcePyx – Jessica Scheick (University of New Hampshire)

Seafloor and Marine Feophysics – Tuesday afternoon

This session highlights new technologies, sensing capabilities, and sciences in areas beyond land, including but not limited to seafloor geodesy and seismology, submarine fiber-optic sensing, and ocean wave monitoring. Offshore data currently occupy a small fraction of the SAGE/GAGE facility but are bound to grow rapidly and contribute insights to key geophysics questions and beyond.

Chairs: Noel Bartlow (University of Kansas), Ƶack Spica (University of Michigan)

  • Imaging the Cascadia Subduction Zone with Marine Active Source Seismic Data – Shoushou Han (University of Texas)
  • Marine Geophysical Studies of a Vapor-Driven Hydrothermal Field on the Floor of Yellowstone Lake – Robert A Sohn (WHOI)
  • Probing the Solid Earth and the Hydrosphere with Ocean-Bottom Distributed Acoustic Sensing – Loïc Viens (LANL)
  • Geodesy on the Seafloor – Mark Zumberge (UCSD/SIO)

New Opportunities and Future Directions – Wednesday morning

This forward-looking session explores the frontiers of geophysics in areas such as instrument design and development, data analyses, and new/upcoming collaborations that are expanding the reach of geophysics. We highlight new technologies and how they are helping to advance geophysics on Earth as well as on other planets. We also look at how innovative approaches to data analysis allow us to learn more from new and existing datasets and also explore the evolving opportunities for interdisciplinary geodesy and seismology.

Chairs: Peter James (Baylor University), Mark Panning (JPL)

  • Geodesy Transforming Our Understanding of Planetary Interior – Anton Ermakov (University of California Berkeley)
  • The Future of Seismology Across the Solar System – Dani Della Giustina (University of Arizona)
  • Electromagnetic Investigations of the Interiors of Solid Worlds – Robert Grimm(Southwest Research Institute)
  • Future Lunar Geophysical Mission Opportunities including the Lunar Geophysical Network – Heidi Fuqua Haviland (NASA Marshall Space Flight Center)

Short Courses

Free half- and whole-day short courses will be offered Sunday March 26, 2023—the day before the main workshop starts.

You can register for short courses during the regular workshop registration process. Short courses are concurrent. You can only sign up for one. Space is limited. PLEASE ONLY SIGN UP if you actually plan to attend. If you decide at a later date you would like to register for a short course, contact communityat symbolearthscope.org.

For students/postdocs who receive travel scholarships, you will be eligible for an additional $150 support stipend if you attend a short course and need an additional night of hotel.

All-day short course: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (lunch break 12-1:30 pm)

Presenters: Mike Floyd and Tom Herring (MIT)

GAMIT/GLOBK In A Day introduces GNSS data processing and analysis using GAMIT/GLOBK (http://geoweb.mit.edu/gg/). The course is designed to acquaint participants with the most common uses of GAMIT/GLOBK: generating geodetic time series and velocities from GNSS data for tectonic geophysics studies. This course is intended to be a primer and prerequisite for participation in our longer, advanced Short Courses, hosted by GAGE periodically.

Audience: The course is designed for beginners and novices who wish to get started with the software and get assistance developing their experiments, as well as those seeking to refresh their knowledge of the software from the basics or otherwise interact with the software developers and maintainers. 

Computer needs: Participants are welcome to attend for informational purposes, such as trying to understand if the GAMIT/GLOBK software will be useful for a given project. All other participants require a laptop and must have acquired a license to run the software before attending the course. We also encourage participants to read through the GAMIT/GLOBK “Quick Start Guide” (http://geoweb.mit.edu/gg/docs/GG_Quick_Start_Guide.pdf), as well as install the software and at least work through the test package before attending where possible, although we will also cover this during the course. 

Ideally each participant will come with a project and/or data in mind, with which to practice throughout the day.

Course goals

Participants will:

  • Learn various uses of GAMIT/GLOBK for GNSS processing, including standard daily session processing using GAMIT and GLOBK, and high-rate kinematic processing using track
  • Have verified and tested installation, and begun to build their own experiment, in preparation for independent use after the course
  • Gain familiarity with common issues, where they arise, to find solutions and progress independently

For course content questions contact Mike Floyd (mfloydat symbolmit.edu)

For Science Workshop logistical questions contact communityat symbolearthscope.org

All-day short course: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (lunch break 12-1:30 pm)

Presenters: Eric Lindsey (University of New Mexico), Ann Jingyi Chen (University of Texas Austin)

The expansion of cloud-based routine processing efforts accompanying the Sentinel-1 mission, and in anticipation of the forthcoming NISAR mission, have dramatically expanded the volume of processed InSAR data in the public domain, providing access to user-friendly InSAR data products. In this full-day short course, we will focus on how to analyze and interpret InSAR data products acquired from modern radar satellites. 

Audience: graduate students and researchers interested in learning more about InSAR.

Please plan to bring a laptop computer to the course. No preparatory other work will be needed.

Course goals

Participants will learn:

  • InSAR background theory and processing methods
  • Common data errors and issues
  • The range of SAR satellite missions and data repositories
  • Time series analysis, data interpretation, and ingesting data into modeling efforts

For course content questions contact Eric Lindsey (eolat symbolunm.edu)

For Science Workshop logistical questions contact communityat symbolearthscope.org

All-day short course: 8:00 am-5:30 pm (lunch break 12-1:30 pm)

Presenters: Wang-Ping Chen (University of Illinois & China University of Geosciences Wuhan), Chunquan Yu (SUSTech), Jiaqi Li (UCLA), Tianze Liu (UCSD), Sifang Chen (University of Chicago), Qing Chen (China University of Geosciences Wuhan)

In comparison with conventional approaches using manmade sources, Virtual Deep Seismic Sounding (VDSS) offers a simple, robust, and low-cost alternative to investigate seismic properties of the crust and the upper mantle. The key in VDSS is that it utilizes strong, deep-penetrating signals from the conversion of shear- to compression-wave near each seismic station as a virtual source of seismic reflection. So, each recording of an earthquake at any seismic station carries its own, free seismic source for probing the lithosphere near that station. 

Recent advances in VDSS, including the use of both post-critical and pre-critical reflections, and auxiliary seismic phases, not only determines bulk crustal properties such as compression- and shear-wave speeds, and thickness, but also constrain the speed and anisotropy of the compression-wave in the uppermost mantle (in lieu of the phase Pn). Furthermore, the method has the capability of investigating additional interfaces within the lithospheric mantle and the crust. The robust, simple nature of VDSS enables individual scientists or small research groups to make significant progress by using the voluminous, public domain data from natural earthquakes.  

In addition to applications of VDSS to various regions around the globe with distinct tectonic settings, this technique has been applied to Martian data, constraining properties of the top 10 km of crust near the NASA InSight mission landing site.

Audience: graduate students and researchers interested in expanding their seismic research methods

Requirements: Only a basic knowledge of seismology and digital signal processing is needed but the course assumes functional proficiency of the Linux/Unix OS. Each participant must have their own Linux/Unix-enabled laptop computer to perform hands-on exercises throughout the day

Course goals

Participants will:

  • Be able to apply VDSS to their own research applications
  • Make their own long seismic profiles using data from a single, deep-focus earthquake
  • See how to use numerous shallow earthquakes to facilitate the investigation of a wide range of seismic properties of the crust and the lithospheric mantle, including but not limited to the construction of 3-D crustal thickness maps

For course content questions contact Wang-Ping Chen (wpchenat symbolillinois.edu).

For Science Workshop logistical questions contact communityat symbolearthscope.org

Half-day short course: 1:30-5:30 pm

Presenters: Ellen Yu, Gabrielle Tepp, Ettore Biondi, Aparna Bhaskaran, Shang-Lin Chen (Caltech)

Are you working on or interested in Southern California seismicity? Would you like to know the ins and outs of Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN) data? Do you want to optimize your data access? Then this short course is for you! In this half-day course, we aim to better prepare researchers for using data from the SCSN. 

The course will cover two main topics: available data products for Southern California seismicity and how to access those products. We will start by detailing SCSN data products, including the earthquake catalog, waveform data, moment tensors, DAS, and more. Participants will learn how the data products are generated and information about their metadata, parameters, and limitations. In the second section, we will cover methods for accessing data products through the Southern California Earthquake Data Center (SCEDC): web services, cloud access via Amazon Web Services, and directly in code via FDSN tools and STP. These two informational sections will be followed by open time for questions, discussion, and exercises. Feel free to bring your own project or try our tutorials. 

Audience: This short course is aimed towards anyone interested in working with Southern California seismic and earthquake data. We welcome new users who want to learn more about what we offer, as well as seasoned researchers who are looking for a more thorough understanding of SCSN/SCEDC products and services.

Please plan to bring a laptop computer to the course. While no preparatory work is required, we highly recommend prior installation of the programming tools (e.g., Python, Matlab) that you are interested in working with.

Course goals

Participants will:

  • Learn available SCSN data products
  • Understand how the data products are generated and their parameters and limitations
  • Be able to access SCSN data through SCEDC tools and services, such as the website, FDSN tools, and Amazon Web Services

For course content questions contact Gabrielle Tepp (gteppat symbolcaltech.edu) or Ellen Yu (eyuat symbolcaltech.edu).

For Science Workshop logistical questions contact communityat symbolearthscope.org

Hotels

Several local hotels have reserved discounted courtesy blocks of rooms for GAGE/SAGE Community Science Workshop attendees. Hotel booking will open a few days after January 24. We will send an announcement when they are available. Thank you for your patience.

Travel Support Scholarships

Undergraduates, graduate students, and postdocs from U.S. domestic colleges and universities are all eligible to apply for travel support scholarships. The application period is now closed. We anticipate notifying scholarship awardees by early February.

If selected, you will receive a travel stipend of up to $1000 to offset attendance costs (e.g. transportation, hotel, registration). You will still be required to pay the workshop registration fee.

Venue

The Workshop will be held at the Pasadena Convention Center in Pasadena, California.

300 E. Green Street
Pasadena, CA 91101

Airports

The Pasadena, California is served by three area airports.

  • Burbank Hollywood Airport (BUR) – 18 miles
  • Los Angeles International Airport (LAX) – 29 miles
  • Ontario International Airport (ONT) – 36 miles

Exhibitor Information

Up to 10 exhibitor tables are available on a first-come first-serve basis. Final deadline February 24, 2023. Reservation fee $1000.

The reservation includes:

  • One (1) 6’ x 30” table
  • Two (2) chairs

There will be basic electrical outlets available throughout the lobby area.

If you require any additional power and/or audio/video, you will need to contract directly with the convention center’s preferred vendor, and submit payment directly to them. Once you have registered and paid the exhibitor fee, EarthScope will provide you with contact information for the convention center audio/video provider along with detailed shipping instructions.

Tables will be available beginning in the afternoon on Sunday, March 26th, and must be cleared no later than 1 PM on Wednesday, March 29th, directly following the end of the workshop.  

Please note that all exhibitor representatives who plan to attend will need to register for the workshop and pay the registration fee.

Have questions? Please contact communityat symbolearthscope.org for more information.