Articles

Students learn firsthand, from UNAVCO field engineer Ryan Turner, how the GPS station at Olivelands Elementary School measures ground movement. The lesson includes discussing why monitoring plate movement is important for the students’ community. (Photo by Beth Bartel, UNAVCO)

PBO Station Highlight


2018-01-29

Station OVLS introduces students to plate movement
Station Specialist Jason Theis explains some of the “brains” of the Transportable Array station. (Photo by Beth Grassi)

Inter-Agency Collaborations Take Center Stage at EarthScope Transportable Array Meeting in Alaska


2018-01-28

New Alaska data reaches beyond earthquakes
Rob Hawman

Rob Hawman


2018-01-24

I got into geology originally because I was always fascinated by the history of the earth.
Science Fair season is coming soon, giving students a chance to explore hands-on science. (Photo by Molly Tedesche)

Education Corner


2018-01-24

Science Fair season is coming soon, giving students a chance to explore hands-on science. (Photo by Molly Tedesche)

In every inSights issue, we feature a few of the dozens of

Spatial variation in slip rate during 1984-1998 inferred from characteristically repeating microearthquakes. The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake led to a long-term acceleration of fault slip. The yellow star is the 1998 Mw 5.1 SJB earthquake.

Creeps and starts on the San Andreas fault near San Juan Bautista


2017-11-10

Want to dig deeper? Click on the "advanced" button in the article for scientific details.
P472: Engineering for Earthquakes

P472: Engineering for Earthquakes


2017-10-16

PBO Station Highlight October 2017
EarthScope inSights header

EarthScope Announcements


2017-10-16

inSights Fall 2017
Teaching Teachers at Alaska Earthquake Center, Fairbanks. (Credit M.Agopian)

Education Corner


2017-10-12

In every InSights issue, ESNO features two of the dozens of tools, modules, and activities that utilize EarthScope data to benefit a wide variety of users (K–12, university educators, informal programs like museums or after-school programs).
Looking up from below and northward along the San Andreas fault zone in the vicinity of the SAFOD core. The drill site, marked by a star, is projected on the green and tan ground surface. Multiple strands of the San Andreas fault are mapped with black lines. The red path of the main SAFOD line intersects the fault at depth, where numerous earthquakes (shown as white balls) happen continuously. (Image from L. Blair, U.S. Geological Survey)

Tracking the Fluids in a Weak Fault


2017-10-12

EarthScope’s San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth reveals the pathways of fluids carried along the fault’s fracture network
Elliot Wilson of Pioneer Earthworks operates the drill at Alaska Transportable Array station D27M. (Photo by Max Enders, IRIS).

EarthScope's Transportable Array Spans Alaska, the Last Frontier


2017-10-12

Elliot Wilson of Pioneer Earthworks operates the drill at Alaska Transportable Array station D27M. Photo by Max Enders, IRIS.